Follow the Golden Irish Whiskey Road – Galway Whiskey Trail

Follow the Golden Whiskey Road - Galway Whiskey Trail

Stunning views of Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way were the background for the launch of a bottled celebration last Friday 27th of May. A celebration of the Galway Whiskey Trail, distilled in the shape of a Single Malt Irish Whiskey with 10 years of age, named The Famous Galway Bay Irish Whiskey, as golden as the gorgeous sunset under which attendees were fortunate enough to toast to the 200th birthday of Galway’s whiskey heritage.

The evening saw us all on board of a boat that sailed from Galway Bay through Conemara and back. Whiskey lovers were treated to the melodies of authentic Irish music played by legendary interpreters Sean Keane and Máirtín O’Connor as The Famous Galway Bay Irish Whiskey was formally introduced and tasted for the very first time.

The Famous Galway Bay Irish Whiskey is smooth, aromatic and mellow, the spirit hinted of bananas, peaches and praline on the the palate. A delicate cinnamon note played in the background as a few exhilarated guests simply burst into dance to the traditional beat, their joyful steps gifted with grace would be the first of many that the trail would require to be traveled.

Back in the city of the tribes a cloud of warm summer rain dropped by briefly enough to just say fáilte, and the crew sheltered at Sonny Molloy’s Irish Whiskey Bar, one of the eleven pubs that conform the Galway Whiskey Trail. The full list is completed by The King’s Head, Blake’s Bar, O’Connell’s, An Púcán, Garvey’s, Garavan’s, MacCambridge’s, Feeney’s, The Dáil and Tigh Neachtain.

Visitors will identify the spots by the stone engraving at their entrances. It is only on these sites that the Galway Bay Irish Whiskey is available by the glass (€7.5) or the bottle (€70). Besides being a brilliant reason to wander around the city’s charming pubs, the trail offers an enriching cultural experience centered on Galway’s meaningful whiskey heritage. One of the historical highlights of the trail is seeing the remains of the Old Persse Distillery -established in 1815- on Nun’s Island from O’Brien’s bridge.

A walk filled with fine storytelling and drinks will also feature visits to buildings over 350 years old and a glimpse at some of the country’s rarest bottles. Collectors will be able to indulge and take home something very especial.

As artisan brewing and distilling undergo a resurgence, it is worth remembering that Galway has a long and proud history of whiskey artisans and that the city’s port was once a key trading location and the gateway for Irish whiskey to sail the world. Nowadays, publicans, tour guides, entrepreneurs and whiskey lovers’ eyes are turning to Galway again, as the city’s potential as a whiskey hub goes beyond its historical value and catches up with the present.

For more information on the Trail visit GalwayWhiskeyTrail.ie

ARTICLE BY GABY GUEDEZ

Gaby ProfileGabriela’s passion for writing is only matched by her love for food and wine. Journalist, confectioner and sommelier, she fell in love with Ireland years ago and moved from Venezuela to Dublin in 2014.

Since then, she has written about and worked in the local food scene, and she’s determined to discover and share the different traditions, flavours and places that have led Irish food and drink to fascinate her.

Gabriela Guédez Gabriela Guédez

 

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